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of trayvon martin and young people all across america and has so painfully demonstrated. but, despite the influences and challenges we face, we are here today to affirm the dream. we are not going to be we are not going to be distracted. we are not going to be defeated. instead, we are going forward into this uncertain future with courage and determination to make the dream a vibrant reality. so, the work to fulfill the dream goes on. and despite the daunting challenges we face on the road to the beloved community, i feel that the dream is sinking deep and nourishing roots all across america and around the world. may it continue to thrive and spread and help bring justice, peace and liberation to all humanity. thank you and god bless you all. [cheers and applause] >> please welcome reverend [applause]e king. >> president obama, mrs. obama, president carter and clinton, congressman lewis, ambassador young, my brother martin iii, to my entire family. i was five months old when my father delivered his "i have a dream" speech and i probably was somewhere crawling on the floor or taking a
in a familiar theme, and that is change has to come to washington. change has to come to america. that was the theme echoed some 50 years ago. one who spoke here today spoke 50 years ago, congressman john lewis. before he spoke they heard from a man who bears the name of a man whose day and speech we remember all too well. only he is is the third, martin luther king iii. >> 50 years ago he delivered a sermon on this mountain, which crystallized like never before the painful pilgrimage, and aching aspirations of africa americanses yearning to breathe free in our own homelands. but martin luther king's utterings of 1963 were not laments of past injustices or a diatribe of true injustices of the day. but it was a tribute to the tenacity of an intrepid people who reused to remain in bondage. they were a clarion call to all people of good will to rise up together, to make this nation listen out the true meaning of its creed, and to perfect within us a more perfect union. and so i stand here today in this sacred place in my father's footsteps. i am humbled by the heavy hand of history,
for equality and economic progress and issued a challenge to america -- to live up to its democratic ideals. how does america measure up today? i'll ask our guests, civil rights pioneer and georgia congressman john lewis, mayor of newark, new jersey, cory booker, and develop nor of louisiana, bobby jindal. also, we'll explore the overall state of american dream -- civil rightses, the struggle of the middle classes, issues at the heart of our political debate. our roundtable weighs in. host of msnbc's "politics nation," the reverend al sharpton, pulitzer prize-winning journalist sheryl wudunn, republican congressman from idaho, raul labrador, and unique perspective from historian doris kearns goodwin as well as "new york times" columnist david brooks. i'm david gregory. all that ahead on "meet the press" this sunday, august 25th. good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous i have a dream speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secreta
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
in the past 50 years we have witnessed what i'd like to call the nonviolent revolution in america, a revolution of values, a revolution of ideas, and our country is a better country. >> you know, the president will speak on wednesday in the same spot. he'll mark 50 years since the i have a dream speech. we've talked over the years, and you told me about a year and a half ago in your view a lot of people can't get comfortable with the idea of an african-american president even though what a testament to the progress and the dream that dr. king had. and you even said during your speech yesterday there are forces, there are people who want to take us back. what specifically are you talking about? >> well, i hear people over and over again saying we want to take our country back. take it back where? where are we going? we need to go forward. we've made so much progress. i often think -- when i was growing up, i thought it was science that said white men, colored men, white women, colored women, colored waiting, those signs are gone. when i first came to washington in 1961, the same ye
.c. should be the 51st state of the united states of america. statehood for 600,000 residents . finally, let it go forth that this is not only a commemoration, a continuation, but what you have here are two generations that have come together. there's a lot said about the joshua generation, the younger people. but i remind them it was the moses generation that pointed the way. we need both generations working side by side together and so let this be a day in which moses points the way for joshua and the walls of segregation, of racism, materialism come tumbling down. with that, let me introduce our first speaker for this segment, the director of foreign policy, committee of the national egislation, dr. michael chang. the day after king died, robert kennedy spoke on the mindless men as of violence. here is what he said. what has violence accomplished? what has it created? we tolerate a rising level of violence. we flor if i killing on movie screens and call it entertainment. we make it easy for men to acquire weapons. we honor swagger and wielders of force. we excuse those who are willing to
. mer "america tonight" is next. >>> what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. would probably be very good at that also. that is it for al-jazeera america. >>> and welcome back. late summer heat wave has prompted many schools across the events. heat stroke is a leading cause of death among athletes, and it is a particular concern for high school football players and their parents at this time of year. one high school in georgia set up new rules after a devastating loss for their te
and every one of us, in unity, in unison, letting those who say that they managed this country of america know that it is the people. it is the voice and the actions of the people that say, we must overcome, and eventually say, we have overcome, because of the involvement of each and everyone. that is our challenge today. let us move for and do what we must do, remembering freedom is not free. we must work for it. [applause] >> peaceful coexistence was a hallmark of dr. king's teachings. he said we must learn to get to live as brothers or perish as fools. welcome the rev. christian stone, and the president of asian american advancing justice. >> greetings from the fellowship of reconciliation, working since 1915 to secure a world of justice and freedom from through nonviolence. today, 50 years after the march on washington, i pay tribute to the visionary organizer of the original march by rustin. as a fellowship of reconciliation staff, rustin co- founded and organized the first freedom ride in 1947. an african-american gay man, rustin was a quaker. his life commitment to nonviolence as a
with the president. and that day, i'll tell you, our work paid off. people came from all over america. some americans living abroad flew home to participate in the march. people came from almost every state, people from idaho, wyoming, montana, church groups, labor groups, student groups, just plain, everyday individuals. >> rose: and what did your heart say to you when you heard martin luther king say, "i have a dream?" >> when martin luther king jr. got to that place in that speech and said, "i have a dream today, a dream deeply rooted in the american dream," i knew he was preaching and he was really preaching. he knew it himself. he turned those marble steps of the lincoln memorial into a modern day pulpit and the crowds were with him. jackson did a song how we got over, how we got over, and the whole place just rocked and rocked. >> rose: let me give you some timeline. april 16, dr. king writes his famous letters from a birmingham jail, and responded to white alabama ministers who urged him to end the demonstration. on june 12 medgar edgars was assassinated. what did you end that day with that yo
of america. residents.or 600,000 forth thatt it go this is not only a commemoration of continuation. but what you have here are two generations that have come together and there is a lot said about the joshua generation. the younger people. them, it was the moses generation that pointed the way. we need both generations working side-by-side together and so let this be a date in which moses points the way for joshua the walls of segregation of racism and materialism come tumbling down. our that, let me introduce irst speaker for this segment, the director of foreign policy friends committee, a national legislation, dr. michael shank. >> the day after martin luther king died, robert kennedy spoke on violence. here is what he said, what has violence accomplished and created? we tolerate a rising level of violence that ignores our common humanity. we glorify killing on movie screens and call it entertainment. we make it easy for men to acquire at weapons. we honor the wielders of force. we excuse those willing to build their lives on the shattered dreams of other. there is another violence just a
, but that is a dangerous belief, said the president. dr. king called america the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. he was right. and still is today. when profit motive and property rights are considered more important than people, he said, militarism is incapable of being conquered. a true revolution of values will look and easily on the glaring contrast to party and well. thise revelation will say way of settling differences is not just. american can lead the way in the revolution of values. no document can make these humans any less of our brothers. the true meaning of compassion and non-parlance is when it helps us to see the enemies point of view. there is nothing to prevent us from re- ordering our priorities. the pursuit of peace will take precedence over the pursuit of war. let us practice what they -- >> ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the national but justice coalition -- of the national black justice coalition. >> one of my mentors told me in order to truly be free, you must give to causes greater than yourself. every day, and educate, allocate, and celebrate the lot
claude mckay, fats waller, duke ellington. america experienced and said, we like the style of these people. they enjoyed it, adopted it, integrated it. and exploited it. the popularity of black style and culture soon spread throughout the country. it was not enough for black folks to be artistically admired. black folks wanted and demanded full participation in the social, political, and economic life of american society. that attitude set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. on wednesday, august 28, 1963, 300,000 people -- 80% of them black -- marched on the nation's capital as did before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come -- and stood before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come. celebrating the past is good. but without a vision for the future, we will never move beyond that past. in 2008, america was ready for an intelligent and articulate black man to sit in the oval office. he brought not only his intelligence, but some swagger into the white house. the reality is
the latest news online any time of day at www.aljazeera.com. >> al-jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. >> introduces "america tonight". gas. >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. states. >> grounded. >> real. >> unconventional. >> we spent time with the gangster disciples. >> escape from the unexpected. >> i am a cancer survivor, not mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. inside of it. >> as the cries in syria plays out, rogue hackers have been busy with cyber attacks on the u.s. if you tried to go to "the new york times" website tuesday to get the latest on syria, you would have been directed to the syrian electric army instead manufacture it has been restored, but twitter accounts and even president obama's social media has been sit since the war in syria began. while it has been a nuisance, the threat o
foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. for each of us, there are days that are turning points. a day that changes our personal life, or a day that changes the nation. sometimes, very rarely, it's one and the same day. just such a day happened to me on wednesday, august 28th, 1963. i was 29 years old, the deputy director of the peace corps, with offices one block from the white house and a short walk from the lincoln memorial. that morning, largely on impulse, inspired by a friend, i joined the quarter of a million americans, people of every age and color, who had come for the march on washington. the event is now most famous for martin luther king, jr.'s "i have a cream "dream" speech, but like many of the others there, i was first transfixed by one of the other speakers, the youngest on the platform. >> brother john lewis. >> his name was john lewis. he had just been named head of sncc, the student nonviol
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
, in this place, at this time 50 years ago today, dr. martin luther king shared his dream for america with america. dr. king was the passionate voice that awakened the conscience of a nation. and inspired people all over the world. the power of his words resonated because they were spoken out of an unwavering belief in freedom and justice, equality and opportunity for all. let freedom ring was dr. king's closing call for a better and more just america. so today people from all walks of life will gather at 3:00 p.m. for bell ringing events across our great country and around the world as we reaffirm our commitment to dr. king's ideals. dr. king believed that our destinies are all intertwined. and he knew that our hopes and our dreams are really all the same. he challenged us to see how we all are more alike than we are different. so as the bells of freedom ring today, we are hoping that it's a time for all of us to reflect on not only the progress that has been made, and we've made a lot, but on what we have accomplished, and also on the work that still remains before us. it's an opportunity today
of justice flickered. it never died. because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, the voting rights law was assigned. because they marched, doors of opportunity in education swung open so their daughters and sons could imagine a life for themselves beyond washing someone else's laundry or shining someone else's shoes. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed. eventually the white house changed. [cheers and applause] because they marched, america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans, but for women and latinos. asians and native americans. catholics, jews, and muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an iron curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside south africa would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. [cheers and applause] those are th
the nation. 1963od with dr. king in when he called on america to be true to its principles. five years later, dr. king stood without me in the sanitation workers of local 1733 demanded justice, dignity and respect. the journey for civil rights, workers rights and economic rights began almost in the moment america was born. it gained new momentum on these steps 50 years ago. it advances whenever the disenfranchised and disillusioned standup, fight back and march forward. because our struggle continues, we come to this but mario not only to commemorate -- this memorial, not only to commemorate the past, but to shape the future. we have a power to carry determination, hope and passion of the march on washington forward. we must also have the courage. when must also have the courage. in the name of dr. king, a philip randolph, bayard rustin, john lewis. on behalf of those whose names will never be known. we must recommit to the struggle as stewards of a nation that belongs to the rich and the poor , to the ceo and the sanitation worker, those with and those without. we have the responsibility to
their government for redress, and to awaken america's long-slumbering conscience. we rightly and best remember dr. king's soaring oratory that day, how he gave mighty voice to the quiet hopes of millions, how he offered a salvation path for oppressed and oppressors alike. his words belong to the ages possessing a power and prophesy unmatched in our time. but we would do well to recall that day itself also belonged to those ordinary people whose named never appeared in the history books, never got on tv. many had gone to segregated schools and sat at segregated lunch counters. they lived in towns where they couldn't vote and cities where their votes didn't matter. there were couples in love who couldn't marry, soldiers who fought for freedom abroad that they found denied to them at home. they had seen loved ones beaten and children fire hosed, and they had every reason to lash out in anger or resign themselves to a bitter fate. and yet they chose a different path. in the face of hatred, they prayed for their tormenters. in the face of violence, they stood up and sat in with the moral force of nonv
and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about 600 people, black and white, many young people, some people who had just left church, decided to march from
to work. how would dr. king see the current racial situation in america? >> it took guts to do that then. and it's going to take guts to finish the job now. >> it is the collapse of the traditional family that is wreaking havoc in the african-american community. >> i stand here today in this sacred place in my father's footsteps. >> the other issue is racial profile acvoter identification requirements. while somewhat important are essentially a sideshow, a sideshow. a sideshow. >> stand tall in your community. fight for diversity. understand its strength. >> sideshow. >> you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out. and get in the way! make some noise! >> and i don't think our society will rise to its full maturity until we come to see that the men are made to live together as brothers. >> sideshow. if dr. king were alive today, i believe he would be brokenhearted about what has happened to the traditional famil family. >> good to have you with us tonight. thanks for watching "the ed show" right here 5:00 monday through friday. chris matthews is at 7:00. stick around to watch his show. bi
in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slow up. we have a moral obligation to press on because of our love for america and our love for the democratic way of life, we must keep moving. in san francisco in 1956 to the mall in 1963 to america today, dr. king's message endures. we must keep moving. our heritage and our hope. advancing civil or voting rights. within two years after the march, there would be a historic civil rights act and a voting rights act. that is
changed america. >> his words belong to the ages. possessing a power and prove if i unmatched in our time. >> i have a dream. >> they opened minds. they melted hearts. >> we must keep the faith and keep our eyes on the prize. >> that was the spirit of young people like john lewis brought to that day. >> and america is that promised land for all of us. >> in the face of violence, they stood up and sat in. >> because they kept marching. america changed. >> and yes, eventually the white house changed. >> free at last, free at last. thank god almighty, we are free at last. >> good to have you with us tonight. thanks for watching. i'm ed schultz. "the ed show." we're here monday through friday 5:00 eastern. today was a big day of emotion for this country. a day of record, a day of reflection. to me, you know what, i am so feeling so good about inside is because i think today was a day of learning for a lot of americans. there are a lot of american who's weren't alive 50 years ago today that kind of wondered what this was all about. and the neat thing about it all is that you can't change the f
the great progress of the past 50 years in america that allows him to be president, that how much hard work we have to come. and it will end up being a speech about economic justice, not just freedom. >> pelley: now we were looking, of course, at the black and white pictures of the day in 1963. there are a quarter of a million people, it is estimated, on the national mall on that day. certainly today there are fewer people at this eventment but a very large crowd, nonetheless here to hear, here to listen to the president who will be speaking in just another moment. the official title of the event in 1963 was the march on washington for jobs and freedom. jobs was the number one thing on that list. and the president today is expected to talk about that, that a great deal of progress has been made in terms of the rights of all americans and the legal rights of all americans. but that in terms of the economy and jobs, not enough progress has been made. it's an interesting point that about three times more african-americans live below the poverty level than white americans. and that was the same
with the national security council, america's top defense intelligence and cabinet officials meeting with the president in the west wing of the white house. a statement from the white house says they reviewed a range of potential options for the united states and the international community, and they note that the gathered group is mindful of the symptoms that are exhibited on many of those images that we have seen coming out in the wake of that chemical attack. chuck hagel, speaking of those options and the military options in particular has told reporters traveling with him in southeast asia that those option require positioning of our forces to be able to carry out whatever the president ultimately decides and we do know that a navy warship has stayed on longer, bringing a total of five into the eastern mediterranean. >> that's anom nus sign for the syrian regime. the red line has been crossed. the president, his rhetoric has toughened. he has talked about a co are fr being deployed by the assad regime. the goal, should the united states pursue a military option, not to enter on o
the nation. >> what was at stake that day? >> the future of america. >> was dr. king's dream fulfilled? the powerhouse roundtable weighs in on that and all the week's politics. it's all right here this sunday morning. >> from abc news, a special edition of "this week" with martha raddatz in cairo. and jonathan karl in washington. starts right now. >>> good morning, george is off today. we're reporting from a region on the brink, and all eyes are on syria, where an apparent chemical weapons attack could lead to american military action. here in cairo, we're just 100 miles from the mediterranean sea where u.s. warships are now at the ready. this morning, officials tell abc news that u.s. navy destroyers now in the mediterranean could be used to carry out limited military strikes. cruise missile strikes, designed to deter or prevent another chemical attack by the assad regime. if this week's suspected attack is verified. >> this is clearly a big event. of grave concern. that starts getting to some core national interest that the united states has. >> president obama has so far been unwill
was its impact on the real washington-- that is, the washington that governs the united states of america? in the lead, martin luther king, the man hailed today above all the others. >> i still have a dream. it is a dream deeply rooted in the american dream. i have a dream. >> schieffer: today, we'll talk about king's dream and the state of race relations with some prominent american american leaders, including former secretary of state colin powell, and legendary civil rights leader, georgia congressman, john lewis, who was with king that day. plus we'll hear general powell's advice to the president on the crisis in the middle east. >> in both egypt and syria, america has to take a much more-- much more clever role. >> schieffer: we'll also talk about the situation in syria with jack reed and michael mccaul. it's all ahead on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: good morning, again. tens of thousands turned out in washington yesterday to mark the 50th anniversary of the march. we'll begin today wit
commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ at&t mobile share for business. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s.
. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google and the world brain. can you say stocktopussy? g102 2 more news. ♪ >>> and welcome back. late summer heat wave has prompted many schools across the events. heat stroke is a leading cause of death among athletes, and it is a particular concern for high school football players and their parents at this time of year. one high school in georgia set up new rules after a devastating loss for their team. >> reporter: it's at the edge of locust grove high school football field just out of atlanta, where glen jones has the best view. his son was forrest jones, number 71 on the football team. drive. >> he was a hard worker. he just went aft
calculations and the reason has to do with not only international norms but also america's core self interest. >> in texas, the fort hood shooter gets the death sentence. nidal hasan, the death sentence now starts an automatic appeals process. on the 50th anniversary of martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech, hundreds of thousands gathered at the national mall. >>> fire continues to go into yosemite national park. that's the news at this hour. we'll see you at 11. >> on america tonight, stepping back, faced with the unraveling of national support for the strike on syria will the u.s. president go it alone? >>> and on the anniversary of the march for jobs and justice we consider just how much difference 50 years have made. >> dr. king would ask, to sit at the integrated lunch count if you can't -- counterif you can't afford the meal. >>> the new fight against another vicious intruder. >> this one is a 10.5% alcohol in there. this is what they drink. and good evening, thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. >>> at the end of a tumultuous day, president obama says if he decides to launc
, but also america's core self interests. >> the army major convicted of killing 13 people at fort hood in texas has been sentenced to die. nadal hassan was sentenced earlier today. that sentence will be automatically appealed. >> on the 50th anniversary of martin luther king's "i have a dream" speech, thousands gathered in washington, d.c. again. former presidents, celebrities and every day americans were there. >> near two weeks, firefighters are till fighting that fire out in california. we'll have the latest news coming up at 11:00 here on aljazeera. ♪ theme ♪ theme >> as the u.s. may be drawing closinger to intervention in syria polls vin to show a large majority of americans oppose military action. how can the u.s. build an international coalition when its leaders can't build one here at home? also, twitter, google and "the new york times" websites suffer cyber attacks. a group connected to the syrian government is the likely culprit. how vulnerable is america's cyber infra structure to another attack. >> the women who worked side by side with the men during the civil movement
in this place at this time 50 years ago today dr. martin luther king shared his dream for america with america. dr. king was the passionate voice that awakened the conscience of a nation, and inspired people all over the world. the power of his words resonated because they were spoken out of an unwavering belief in freedom and justice equality and opportunity for all. let freedom ring was dr. king's closing call for a better and more just america. so today people from all walks of life will gather at 3:00 p.m. for bell ringing events across our great country and around the world as we reaffirm our commitment to dr. king's ideals. dr. king believed that our destinies are all intertwined, and he knew that our hopes and our dreams are really all the same. he challenged us to see how we all are more alike than we are different. so as the bells of freedom ring today we are hoping that it's a time for all of us to reflect on not only the progress that has been made, and we've made a lot, but on what we have accomplished, and also on the work that still remains before us. it is an opportunity today t
, d.c. to share my thoughts on what i think we need to focus on in public education in america. >> thank you. thank you, joe. >> i am a product of forced busing for racial equality. i take you back to the '70s, where diversity was a word that was foreign to america, but it was the future. i take you to birmingham, alabama, last night, where i did a radio town hall and i can tell you what's happening in america right now. the dream can only be realized if we pay attention to what's going on in our own backyard. when we start picking and choosing neighborhoods, who's going to get the resources and who's not going to get the resources, we will lose this country, we will lose the vision of diversity, we will lose the opportunity of equality to move all people forward. you need to pay attention to what's happening in your backyard to make sure that your school and those young kids get the resources they need to have an opportunity in america that will help them grow. being a product of the middle class, i was the one that was afforded the opportunities. and if we start picking and c
people. also white people, and to know that a nation such as america and the reason that i struggle with it so hard and i grapple with it so hard is because i really believe in the potential of this country. and this country has not realized its potential, it has not even begun to scratch the surface and the humanities. and because i do feel strongly about that potential and because of the kind of inheritance i've had, it was necessary for may to be this. >> and we are very happy to have harry belafonte joining us now on the program today from new york. mr. belafonte, looking back, what do you think about the promise of dr. king's dream, of everything you worked for? what has been achieved? what still need to bes to be ac? >> i do believe that that moment was filled with dreams of over two centuries of expectation that came from the african-american community. and a big part of the american community. we have enjoyed a great journey in achieving the victories that we did. now today i think that we are under a great threat of having those victories reversed. i think there's a new con
far. >>> those are the headlines at that hour. "america tonight" is next on al jazeera. i'll see you back here at 11:00 eastern time, 8 pacific. ♪ >>> on "america tonight," building the case for action against syria, u.s. forces stand ready to go now what is next? >>> a spike in temperatures forces a time-out. the hid endangers for young athletes, and what can save them. >> we helped him up and started walking back to school, and the fell once again. >>> and timeless words scrawled on scraps, how the letter from birmingham jail lead to a revolutionary moment in american history. >> the letter was a call to the national conscious of america. ♪ >>> and good evening. thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. a showdown looms with washington tonight that western powers are gearing up for some kind of military strike against the government of bashar al-assad. tell us what all of this means. and what is going to happen next? >> the white house insists that the president has not yet made a decision to go ahead with military strikes. you would not know that from the rhetoric with -- from
at this time 50 years ago today, dr. martin luther king shared his dream for america with america. dr. king was the passionate voice that awakened the conscious of a nation and inspired people all over the world. the power of his words resonated because they were spoken out of an unwavering belief in freedom, injustice, equality, and opportunity for all. let freedom ring was dr. king's closing call for a better and more just america. so today people from all walks of life will gather at 3:00 p.m. for bell-ringing events across our great country and around the world as we reaffirm our commitment to dr. king's ideals. dr. king believed that our destinies are all intertwined, and he knew that our hopes and our dreams are really all the same. he challenged us to see how we all are more alike than we are different. so as the bells of freedom ring today, we're hoping that it's a time for all of us to reflect on not only the progress that has been made, and we've made a lot, but on what we have accomplished and also on the work that still remains before us. it's an opportunity today to recall wher
of an america where all citizens would sit together at the table of brotherhood. >> his words belong to the ages. possessing a power and prophecy unmatched in our time. >> good afternoon. i'm tamron hall. 50 years and nearly two generations and here we stand, a nation reflecting on one of the greatest moments in our history. and a guiding light for our future. the faces of those carrying the torch lit by dr. martin luther king jr. were back today, retraitsing the steps taken by a quarter million americans seeking equality and jobs. it's also today where the first african-american president, arguably the personification of dr. king's dream addressed the crowd in the shadow of greatness. dr. king's speech was incredibly just under 17 minutes long. 1651 words, he was only 34 years old. a speech delivered in a different age at the time carried by just a few networks without the power of the internet or twitter or facebook to help spread that message. it is a speech that the king family closely protects, making sure to preserve the legacy of an iconic leader. now, 50 years later, on this historic ann
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and the pursuit of happiness. it's obvious today that america has defaultsed on this promissory note in so far as her citizens of colors are concerned. although black americans had been given a bad check, it had come back marked insufficient funds, he had refused to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity in this nation. he said, we have come to cash this check. we think of that speech and that march as a singular event. and there is in fact nothing like it in our history. but it is less of a pillar and more like a peak, it is a summit that was reached. it was a moment in an ongoing movement that was well underway and not nearly over by the time that happened. and that march, and that speech like the campaign to desegregate the northwood theater in baltimore, and those protests with the terrifying consequences in america's georgia, that march was a tactic dreamed up in realtime by real imperfect people working together as a body in motion making incremental decisions about what to do next. about what might work. when we come back, we will be joined by the m
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